click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20130126
20130203
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 5
KQEH (PBS) 3
CNN 2
CNNW 2
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
. >> that's only if you think 80,000 people dead is not ugly. yes, sir. adding a mac >> foreign-policy and especially security systems. this is another area where congress really has a role to play. the administration is basically decided that mohamed morsi at egypt is the new mubarak. the guy in the seat we will now help. it's completely indifferent to what our aid program should look like and what the desired outcome and egypt should be. the only thing they appear to be interested in is the continuation of the israeli egyptian camp david accords, which are obviously of great interest, but not really the only thing they should animate us and we talk about the largest country in the middle east. when i thought we were delivering fighter jets to the egyptian military, i just asked myself, what message does this send? the rule should be not the foreign aid is bad and not that foreign aid is good and not that military assistance is good or bad, it is the u.s. taxpayer dollar used to further u.s. tax your interest and every time a new government comes into power, we should take that aid do
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
on foreign policy can do it through hagel today, through this hearing. the past positions hagel has taken where supporters of israel believe that he has made statements that suggest he's soft on israel, he does not support the president's positions on iran, or that he does not view hezbollah as a terrorist organization, administration officials say he will clearly address all those past statements, put them to bed and make it emphatic that he fully supports the president's positions today and yet they know this will be a drawn out in their view political exercise and think he could get confirmed by well more than the 60% majority because he's a member of the senate club and in the end they support somebody who they view as a senator and in the white house's view still a mainstream person. jake? >> we're listening right now as we're watching right now as senator levin of michigan introduces the new members of the senate armed services committee, senator levin, democrat of michigan we see there, next is senator chuck hagel, was former republican senator from virginia john warner, chuck hage
to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran, what ever it should be. at cbs we made a deal about never giving you the questions or categories, because you are supposed to keep that distance. >> do you feel any sense of discomfort at having to participate in what you did this time. >> this is the first time i have that this way and this was new, and basically -- janet called me and said, this time we want to divide this up into six categories, and i said, fine. you did not have to say in what order were anything but i think to in really don't need today's sophisticated world. >> but you did. and this hadn't happened before so why was the change. >> with the commission said to me was that they were keen on two things. and the commission is running this. the three of us and candy are not rolling this. >> by your jim lehrer. >> -- you are jim lehrer. >> this is how they ask and here is how the imitation goes to the debate. and if under these rules, would you do this certain fang -- i found out what they propose and made the decision, i would do that and here is what they
with the mainstream of u.s. foreign and defense policy and also with president obama. chuck hagel believes we must preserve the american strength as a force for good in the world. he recognizing that protecting our interests requires strong allies and friends, as well as strong american leadership. third, chuck has the depth of experience and leadership skills required to handle this tough job. there is no shortage of security challenges around the world, as this committee knows and as you enumerated this morning, mr. chairman. a very large and impressive group of former cabinet officials and public servants from both sides of the aisle have said that they trust chuck hagel with this important responsibility. and i strongly, i strongly agree. fourth, on the fiscal side, i am will be athat chauck powerful advocate for a common- sense approach in this administration and on capitol hill regarding fiscal challenges to the defense budget. he understands that our defense capabilities are being threatened on two budget friends. first, sequestration, with its damaging, across the board, up from the budget
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
.s. wages war and the president's attempts to put an imprint on u.s. foreign policy. today, hagel will have his first chance to publicly respond to his critics, in a 112-page questionnaire requested by the committee, hagel begins to do that on iran and israel. this is what he said in the questionnaire, and he'll be questioned about this today. on the questionnaire, i am committed to considering all options to counter iran and its aggression and to maintain u.s. support for missile defense systems in israel. translation, he's for unilateral military action if necessary against iran. more. "if iran continues to flout its international obligations, it should continue to face severe and growing consequences. while there is time and space for diplomacy, backed by pressure, the window is closing." this is what he says on gay rights in the questionnaire, "i fully support gay and lesbian women serving openly in the u.s. military and am committed to a full implementation of the repeal of don't ask, don't tell." and on the use of force, "i believe we must think very carefully before we commit our arm
of a foreign-policy think tank. at his confirmation hearing today, he had some back and forth with former colleagues, including senator john mccain. that exchange is about an hour and a half into the hearing. later, we will get your thoughts about the nomination and hearing on our phone lines at 11:00 p.m. eastern, 8:00 pacific. carl levin chairs the armed services committee and makes the opening statement. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets today to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitmen
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
who work in foreign policy are drawn in. in the old days, this is not as embraced as it is now. for those of us who didn't study history, a lot of us remember that all of these inconsequential and rather uninteresting country is, whether it was czechoslovakia of the time or the molly of the time, they were the precursors to larger battles that could have been dealt with had they been dealt with early. i wonder thinking through that where we see things going and underscored the throat open and see who grabs at first. >> okay. well, let's just compare senator kerry and senator hagel to senator hillary clinton and bob gates. by that standard, both of the nominees -- they are not independent thinkers and they have no track record either legislating in the intellectual sense or advancing important ideas or on international politics. but the underlying cause is the president's lack of interest in these issues. >> yes, i have another part of this discussion. the republican party is now focused on trying to be responsible about what kind of physical environments we leave to our childre
against foreign persons, i think, is troubling from a moral, ethical, and policy point of view. but i don't subscribe to the fact that it's illegal under u.s. law. and that's the law that the president is bound by the constitution to follow. my focus has been primarily, and i'm not saying it's a good program. i'm just saying that i think it's a moral policy question rather than a legal one primarily for the president. i focus primarily on the targeted killing of american citizens, which does bring into play the united states constitution and the rule of law in the united states. and i'm very troubled about that aspect of it. >> can you help us understand how this official program of targeted killing works? >> apparently, the agencies, primarily the pentagon and the c.i.a. nominate people to be on the list. and it goes through what the white house promises is a very rigorous process of review to determine if those people should or should not be on the list. we don't know exactly what the standard is. but it involves a number of criteria, including whether the host country, the country in w
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
union. but a lot of people in the washington foreign policy establishment both republicans, and democrats, think that's impossible. that if you want to deal from an iran or from a north korea you have to not raise these unpleasant issues but, you know, frankly i think it is to the benefit of u.s. security to do it. now going forward i would it is unlikely. this is an administration here in the united states especially with john kerry becoming secretary of state, chuck hagel, secretary of defense and sham elections coming in iran in june, this is an administration that is going to want to engage again in negotiations, think they can get the deal of the century. so unfortunately i think the trend in washington is against i can making a bigger issue of this but i think that is unfortunate. martha: if i were the pastor's wife listening to you it would be hard to be hopeful. what do you think the outcome will be here? >> well, you know, there is at least a trend in iran of fewer executions. there is an instance of people not serving their full terms and being let out. but it may
in 2008, amy has covered a variety of topics including foreign policy, national security, political advertising and the election of the new supreme court justice on nj's ninth justice blog. prior to nj, she was a staff rir writer for freedom of the press. our report from the automakers' panel will include -- and i'd love you all to be able to hear these folks' names as i introduce them -- great. robert bienenfeld, environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin, director regulatory affairs, chrysler llc. tom stricker, vice president of technical and regulatory affairs and energy and environmental research, toyota motors, north america incorporated. amy, if you can, if you'd like to get started, um, we'll try to get the audience to quiet down. >> well, thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists, so i guess that's a two-thirds majority, so i think we're going to go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion we just had with jeep that mccarthy, mary nichols and the oth
also to develop a foreign policy that reflects, again, the dynamics of the region as they really are today. lastly, i think this is an opportunity for the committee to finally do the work that it should have been doing for years. when you read the record and realize we have never done an authorization of the state department in the six years i have been here, we have never looked at how foreign aid has been spent. we have never done a top to bottom review. it is something people like you come to this position, look at as something that is healthy. there was mention of cost. i was disappointed with the arb when the first thing that came out of the mouths of people i respect was money, money, money. this committee would have no idea whether the appropriate amount of money is being spent or if that could have prevented what was happening -- what happened because we have never had an authorization. i want to close again by thanking you for your service, thanking you for your friendship, thanking you for your transparency, and i certainly look forward to your testimony. i know it will
policies make sense. and there are very few foreign service officers, spread out all over the world, and they are your best line of defense against ad policy. -- bad policuy. host: we want to take our viewers to a live event at the brookings institute. it is the evolution of joints -- a force operations command and the pursuit of al qaeda in iraq. it is a conversation with general stanley mcchrystal, also featuring mike o'hanlon of brookings. thanks so much for joining us on "the washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] mf good morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thanks for coming out. it is an unusual treat, even at a place where we have such amazing events, to have general stanley mcchrystal here today. i am mike o'hanlon, one of the members of the 21st century defense initiative. we are hosting this event with bruce riddell, who runs the -- first readout -- bruce riddell .- bruce ridedel, general mcchrystal build up an organization into what was the state-of-the-art capability that u
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)